Dairy-Free No Churn Ice Cream

It’s National Ice Cream Day! We believe everyone should be able to celebrate, including our dairy-free friends (like me).

I am a sucker for ice cream. I can eat whole foods and healthy all day until someone offers me ice cream. It’s my weakness. Well, was my weakness. Then I found out I am lactose intolerant and dairy gives me major migraines. But who says dairy-free ice cream can’t be just as creamy and delicious as the real stuff?! So Tim and I tested our no-churn ice cream recipe with coconut milk products, and it is delicious.

4 ingredients. 10 minutes (plus freeze time). No churn. That’s it!

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No Churn Coconut Vanilla Ice Cream:

Ingredients:

  • 1 can sweetened condensed coconut milk
  • 2 cups coconut whipping cream
  • 1 T vanilla bean paste (can sub extract)
  • Pinch of salt

Procedure:

  1. Whip coconut cream.
  2. Fold all ingredients together.
  3. Freeze until solid, about 4 hours.
  4. Eat the entire bowl.

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We used Nature’s Charm sweetened condensed coconut milk and coconut whipping cream:
Nature’s Charm Coconut Whipping Cream (6 pack)*
Nature’s Charm Sweetned Condensed Coconut Milk, 11.25 Oz. (Pack of 2)*

Now everyone can enjoy National Ice Cream Day!

-K

 


*We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

Corn Hacks

I’ll spare you the corny jokes and cut right to the chase. It’s officially corn season and we wanted to share with you our favorite corn hacks and utilization tricks!

Shucking corn is the worst part of fresh corn. It’s a mess and seems almost impossible to get all the “hairs” off. A trick we use in the professional kitchen is plastic wrap… if it’s static-y enough to attract your hair, why wouldn’t it attract corn hair? Simply pull a piece of plastic wrap from the roll and run in along the corn, and the hair will come right off.

Need to cut the cobs in half? Using a knife straight through the cob can be tough, not to mention dangerous since corn is prone to rolling. Instead, insert the front of a knife into the flesh of the corn just until you reach the cob. Roll the knife forward until the cob has made a complete rotation. Then, snap the corn in half with your hands. Easy and safer!

If you’re cutting the corn off the cobs for kids or using it for a dish, don’t throw away the cobs! The juice that comes off the cobs when you cut into it is great flavor. Instead, throw them in a pot of water with onion, celery, bay leaf, and desired spices. Simmer for two hours, or until the corn flavor is prominent. Utilize the corn broth in soups in place of vegetable stock or water.

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Raining or cold (or just too dang hot) outside but you wanted to grill or char your corn? Do it inside on the stove! Turn the flame on medium-high and place the corn directly over the flame. Rotate as needed until your corn is charred! Same great flavor as the grill.

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Hopefully these tips help you enter into corn season with ease!

-K

Techniques: Hard Cooked Eggs

So let’s talk eggs. Eggs are actually, when you break it down, a super food. First off its crazy inexpensive. Each egg only costs you about $0.20. So what does $0.20 buy you? Great question. For every egg you buy you are getting:

  • About 70 calories
  • 6 grams of protein.
  • 0 sugar
  • 0 carbohydrates

Overall not a bad deal for under two dimes.

Have you ever boiled an egg? Stop. That’s a trick question. So here is fun fact #1: You never want to boil eggs. Rather simmer them. Why? Because the only thing you should be boiling is your socks. But in all actuality the reason you never want to boil them is because eggs cook very fast. Have you ever peeled your hard-cooked egg, taken a bite, and gaged at the dry grayish tinted yolk? Me too. Me too. Eggs cook best at a simmer. I like to cook my eggs by:

  • Bringing them up to a boil
  • And turning them down to a simmer
  • For eight minutes.
  • Eight minutes is the magic number.
  • After eight minutes I like to take my eggs out
  • And cool them down in some cold water.

If you cook your eggs like this you’ll have a soft, creamy, and bright yellow yolk!

Now a days you might see on a restaurant menu an option for a soft cooked egg. I just had one in a bowl of homemade ramen. It looks like a hard cooked egg on the outside but when you cut into it the yolk is runny, like an over easy egg. You can achieve this type of egg by cooking it three to four minutes. About half the time for a hard cooked egg. We actually put together a video to show you the progression of the egg as it cooks. From a one minute egg all the way to an eight minute egg.

And finally, why would cooking change the color of the yolk? That is another really great question! It happens because there is iron in the egg yolk and hydrogen sulfide in the egg white. When the egg is cooked, the iron in the egg yolk and the hydrogen sulfide react with each other. This is completely harmless but the trick is really just cooking the eggs the right amount of time. Not too little and not too much!

Hard Cooked Egg Guide

Happy cooking.

-Timothy