Techniques: Hard Cooked Eggs

So let’s talk eggs. Eggs are actually, when you break it down, a super food. First off its crazy inexpensive. Each egg only costs you about $0.20. So what does $0.20 buy you? Great question. For every egg you buy you are getting:

  • About 70 calories
  • 6 grams of protein.
  • 0 sugar
  • 0 carbohydrates

Overall not a bad deal for under two dimes.

Have you ever boiled an egg? Stop. That’s a trick question. So here is fun fact #1: You never want to boil eggs. Rather simmer them. Why? Because the only thing you should be boiling is your socks. But in all actuality the reason you never want to boil them is because eggs cook very fast. Have you ever peeled your hard-cooked egg, taken a bite, and gaged at the dry grayish tinted yolk? Me too. Me too. Eggs cook best at a simmer. I like to cook my eggs by:

  • Bringing them up to a boil
  • And turning them down to a simmer
  • For eight minutes.
  • Eight minutes is the magic number.
  • After eight minutes I like to take my eggs out
  • And cool them down in some cold water.

If you cook your eggs like this you’ll have a soft, creamy, and bright yellow yolk!

Now a days you might see on a restaurant menu an option for a soft cooked egg. I just had one in a bowl of homemade ramen. It looks like a hard cooked egg on the outside but when you cut into it the yolk is runny, like an over easy egg. You can achieve this type of egg by cooking it three to four minutes. About half the time for a hard cooked egg. We actually put together a video to show you the progression of the egg as it cooks. From a one minute egg all the way to an eight minute egg.

And finally, why would cooking change the color of the yolk? That is another really great question! It happens because there is iron in the egg yolk and hydrogen sulfide in the egg white. When the egg is cooked, the iron in the egg yolk and the hydrogen sulfide react with each other. This is completely harmless but the trick is really just cooking the eggs the right amount of time. Not too little and not too much!

Hard Cooked Egg Guide

Happy cooking.

-Timothy

Techniques: The Watermelon

Did you know a watermelon is 92% water? You’ll never have to wonder again why it’s called a watermelon. Among water, watermelons contain vitamin B6, potassium, vitamin A, vitamin C, and antioxidants. While it’s available year round, watermelon is best for flavor and optimum nutrients in the summertime.

Random watermelon facts:

  • Contrary to popular belief, the entire watermelon can be utilized, not just the flesh and juice. The rind can be pickled or even sauteed.
  • A watermelon is a “cousin” in the botanical family to pumpkins, cucumbers, and squash.
  • There are over 300 different varieties of watermelon
  • The worlds heaviest watermelon weighed in at 350.5 lbs, grown by Chris Kent in Tennessee in 2013

Cutting a watermelon can sometimes be an intimidating task because of its size. However, a watermelon is cut very similarly to a cantaloupe and a pineapple. Here’s our tutorial:

 

For more technique videos, check out our techniques video series page to see the list.

Thanks for watching!

-K

In Season: Summer

Happy summer – it’s prime time for BBQ’s, bonfires, grilling, and more! We’ve been excited to share with you our summer produce list.

tomato-83802

Some of the items on the list aren’t surprising – tomatoes and cucumbers are a summer garden staple. Other items are less obvious, like herbs such as basil and cilantro.

In the beginning of summer peaks apricots, arugula, avocados, blackberries, cilantro, dill, mangoes, peas, raspberries, and strawberries.

In mid-summer peaks basil, green beans, blueberries, cherries, eggplant, nectarines, peaches, yellow squash, watermelon, and zucchini.

Towards the end of summer we have bell peppers, bok choy, celery, chard, corn, cucumbers, figs, grapes, guavas, horseradish, melons, onions, plumbs, tomatoes, and tomatillos.

Summer Produce Printable

Summer Produce Image

Print this guide and stick it to your fridge or bring it with you when grocery shopping.

Eating produce in season maximizes flavor as well as nutrition, so what’s stopping you?

-K

P.S. Want to know more about when items are in season, or what to pair them with? Check out this book: The Flavor Bible.