Corn Hacks

I’ll spare you the corny jokes and cut right to the chase. It’s officially corn season and we wanted to share with you our favorite corn hacks and utilization tricks!

Shucking corn is the worst part of fresh corn. It’s a mess and seems almost impossible to get all the “hairs” off. A trick we use in the professional kitchen is plastic wrap… if it’s static-y enough to attract your hair, why wouldn’t it attract corn hair? Simply pull a piece of plastic wrap from the roll and run in along the corn, and the hair will come right off.

Need to cut the cobs in half? Using a knife straight through the cob can be tough, not to mention dangerous since corn is prone to rolling. Instead, insert the front of a knife into the flesh of the corn just until you reach the cob. Roll the knife forward until the cob has made a complete rotation. Then, snap the corn in half with your hands. Easy and safer!

If you’re cutting the corn off the cobs for kids or using it for a dish, don’t throw away the cobs! The juice that comes off the cobs when you cut into it is great flavor. Instead, throw them in a pot of water with onion, celery, bay leaf, and desired spices. Simmer for two hours, or until the corn flavor is prominent. Utilize the corn broth in soups in place of vegetable stock or water.

IMG_3678

Raining or cold (or just too dang hot) outside but you wanted to grill or char your corn? Do it inside on the stove! Turn the flame on medium-high and place the corn directly over the flame. Rotate as needed until your corn is charred! Same great flavor as the grill.

IMG_3697

Hopefully these tips help you enter into corn season with ease!

-K

Techniques: The Pineapple

Summer is approaching quickly (and the weather thinks it’s already here), which means it’s fruit season! And by fruit season, I mean the good, flavorful fruit. Not the pale colored, tastes-like-nothing fruit that we can still buy in the winter. Blackberries, blueberries, cantaloupe, cherries, limes, nectarines, peaches, raspberries, watermelon, all come into season in the summer.

Today, we’re focusing on a pineapple. A pineapple is high in magnesium and vitamin C. Over 25 million tons of pineapple are grown yearly worldwide. There are tons of ways to cut a pineapple, but we want to show you what we’ve found to be the easiest, with the least amount of waste. Because who wants to waste delicious pineapple?!

We started our techniques video series with the onion, and we’re continuing it with a fruitful summer! Be sure to tune into our YouTube channel for all the techniques. We’re kicking off a fruitful few weeks with the pineapple cutting tutorial, and we will continue with a watermelon video and a cantaloupe video, too!

Without further ado, we bring you Techniques: The Pineapple.

Thanks for watching! Be sure to let us know if there’s a technique you’d like us to do a video of. We want to hear from you!

-K

P.S. Having a hard time with this, or any, pineapple cutting technique? This is a nifty tool my mom swears by:

Silver Stainless Steel Pineapple De-Corer Peeler Stem Remover Blades for Diced Fruit Rings by Super Z Outlet*

 


*We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.

This part always makes me cry.

You probably already know what I’m going to say. Cutting an onion. I’ve heard all the tricks… run hot water nearby, leave the root intact, lemon juice, freezing the onion, what have you. None of them work for me. So if you have some magical trick, please feel free to share!

Cutting an onion is one of the first techniques I learned in culinary school. It’s a basic technique used constantly, as onions are a great source for flavor building in cooking. I’ve gotten a ton of questions on how to properly cut an onion. As any chef will tell you, there are many ways to do something that achieves the same end result. Here is how we cut an onion – a quick and easy way to dice and slice an onion:

Tips for our method:

  • Use a sharp knife – this makes all the difference. A sharp knife makes this technique easy, and a lot safer.
  • Keep your fingers out of the way. When making the horizontal cuts to dice, be sure to keep your fingers even with your palm.
  • Make the horizontal and vertical cuts as big or small as your desires dice size. For example: if you want a small dice, make both sets of cuts about 1/4 inch apart.

Mastering this trick is important since onions are a foundational ingredient in so many recipes!

We like using cutting boards with grips on the sides to prevent the board from slipping, like these:


The Original GORILLA GRIP (TM) Set of 3 Non-Slip Reversible Cutting Boards, BPA Free, FDA Approved Materials (Set of 3 Boards: Green)

-K

 


*We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.